The Incredibles

Hi all!

May I just say I have missed all of you readers terribly.  I started a new job and while I’m happy to say that I’m loving every minute of it I am busier than ever. Fortunately, my lovely and now Seattle based sister A.C. Wilson has written an amazing guest post that I invite you to read below. Please enjoy as our (mostly her) gift to you on the Feast of the Assumption:

One of my favorite movies ever is a Pixar movie called “The Incredibles.” It’s got everything- action, adventure, family values, coming of age…it’s a great movie (and I hear there’s a sequel coming soon! Yes!). And when reading the gospel, I found myself reminded of one of the last scenes in the movie.

The Incredibles family had just returned from their great adventure, and all is well, until they arrive home. Their youngest son Jack Jack, believed to be with a babysitter, had been kidnapped by the story’s villain, Syndrome. Just as they arrive, Syndrome takes off on his rocket boots with the baby in his arms, and the family is panicking. Suddenly, Mrs. Incredibleturns to her husband and says “Throw something!” and he replies, “I can’t, I might hit Jack Jack!”

But then an awesome revelation occurs, and Mrs. Incredible suggests “Bob, throw me!” and he does. It’s a perfect shot, and the baby, now tumbling from the sky, lands safely in his mother’s arms, and gets to the ground safely. Then Mr.Incredible, after hearing another threat to his son’s life, hurls his *new* car at Syndrome’s plane, and effectively destroys him.

And this whole turn of events reminded me of the parable of the wheat and the weeds, where Jack Jack is the wheat, an innocent baby who is nothing but loved by his Father, and Syndrome is the weed, which represents a person with evil planted deep in his heart by Satan. If Mr. Incredible had hurled his car at the retreating Syndrome too soon, it would have destroyed evil, but also his child. So immediately it was out of the question.

So it is with God and the problem of evil. He could toss his divine “car” and destroy Satan whenever he likes, but if it isn’t a well timed throw, he would, with his crushing blow, destroy our freedom to choose Him, making us little more than spiritual ants, with no say for our own souls. So immediately it is out of the question. Because God made us to be more than ants. And He can and will destroy evil, but not until the proper time.

But people don’t get this, myself included at times. We see sin in it’s ugliest, most base form, and naturally we are repulsed. As we should be. We have all grown up among the wheat and the weeds. But then we ask God “Why?” Why would a loving God make the world this way, with so much suffering and evil?  And that is a question we cannot ask.

Because the real question we should be asking is “Why not?” In a world tainted by original sin, why do we not expect sin and evil to manifest itself? And this is not meant to be callous or unfeeling toward the suffering in the world. It is truly shameful that we allow certain sufferings to persist, heartbreaking when we can’t predict or mitigate it, and all around contrary to how God originally designed us to live. But the question remains, why should we expect the world to work in harmony and goodness, while the worldly, respected powers that be tried and convicted the true source of harmony and goodness (see: Christ’s Passion and death) for the crimes of mankind?

And that is the most extreme case, but I think it has real bearing in our lives today. How often do we blame our problems on God? How often do we neglect our prayers, and then blame God for being the cold and unfeeling one? How often to we distract ourselves every which way, and blame God when our lives have no direction? I know I do. Often.

But that acknowledgment is exactly why God holds back his judgment. Because we are sinful and sorrowful, weak and in need of a savior. He knows that, and He is our loving Father. When we truly believe that we are weak but God loves us, and rely on him, then the world becomes a less dark, sinful place. Plus, when we choose Him over all the temptations and delights of the world, a love that you know is true and unselfish is able to form.

Going back to our metaphor, when Mr. Incredible couldn’t throw the car, he sent his wife. So God sent His son, to save us from the seemingly insurmountable plot against us. It’s our job to resist evil, to allow Jesus to rescue us, and live the mission in gratitude. God will take care of the rest.

 

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The Latest in the New Evangelization

Hi all!

So while this title like most of my titles past lacks inspiration creativity and pleases probably no one but me due to the ever so slight pun, it does capture my current emotion pretty well.

The internet gets a lot of flack for being the source of all evil in society and, as a millennial who grew up with the internet, I can see the validity to points of the argument. However, as I’ve been blogging and getting into the New Evangelization I think it can also be a really incredible tool for evangelizing and bringing people together who otherwise never would have met. For example, now you can even Follow my blog with Bloglovin

I really like blogging, so much so that a few months back I opened up a forum for guest contributions to absolutely ANYONE who felt they had something to say about their own faith journey and how it’s played out in their life.

It has yielded such amazing results including an awesome guest post from my very own amazing little sister A.C. Wilson which I am more proud of then I can say.

The offer still stands open to ALL and I am pleased to announce that there is now another guest post will be ready for publishing Thursday 2/23 at 6 PM eastern from Sr. Christina from the community of Dillingen Franciscan Sisters in North Dakota. NORTH DAKOTA. Points for the internet for making that happen. I’d never met anyone from North Dakota to that point.

I told her that my blog community is probably the equivalent of a loving small town like the ones I imagine are in North Dakota! (I will eventually get over it I promise) I also told her that posting wouldn’t get her a million views overnight or make the community an internet sensation. But I told her I do have something far better, at least in my mind.

I told her that those who read these blog tend to be the type that are seeking: seeking happiness, seeking to be challenged intellectually, seeking to be inspired but most of all seeking God in the everyday whether they have admitted it to themselves or not. The people that I know read this blog are my favorite kind of people, people that are open to letting things outside themselves touch their heart. Only in this environment can truth and beauty resonate.

So in the coming weeks I am going to post a short bio about Sr. Christina and her community. Then I will publish the beautiful piece she submitted to me. I encourage you all to read it and maybe even to check out their site because why not?

And lastly I wanted to thank you all for inspiring me with your readership, your thoughtful comments, and for making this blog possible in the first place. I am truly humbled that anyone actually takes the time to read it and it has given me such joy not only to share little pieces of my walk with God but especially in hearing about yours as well.

And in that spirit should you ever want to share in a more profound way I am posting the link for submission again here. (#shameless)

Have a blessed rest of your Thursday!

The Child

When I was a teacher on my first ever teaching assignment (on payroll and not as a student teacher) I had an obstinate little child whose name was a derivative of the name Eve, an irony which I appreciated since I was teaching at a Catholic school.  This little child, but four years old,  gave me a run for my money. She was the one who whined, who constantly broke the rules, who already had a reputation among the other teachers as a handful, and who never listened to a word I said. Definitely not the ideal student for a first-year teacher trying to impress. However, Eve was my favorite student.

Eve came to me at a time in my life where I was growing in my relationship with God, fighting to believe in His unconditional love for me. I was meditating heavily, per the advice of the confessor I had left behind in Charlottesville, on the story of the prodigal son. I used to go to a fairly secluded beach about five minutes from the school where I worked and walk aimlessly along the shore. It was an interesting experience because I realized when I tried to place myself in the shoes of the prodigal walking back home I couldn’t make it all the way back. Too ashamed of who I had been and what I had done, full of doubt at a loving reception, I could not approach the center of intimate family life. I could not approach the table even for the promise of the feast.

I believe it was because of this that God gave me Eve. Eve reminded me of myself in the context of my relationship with God. Obstinate, disobedient, but also frustrated because no matter how hard she tried she just couldn’t be as good as the other kids. Eve would often act up, disobeyed the classroom rules (often including my direct instruction) and exhausted my patience. It is really hard to have a child look into your eyes and do the exact thing you are telling them not to do. Not only does it undermine your authority, I knew as the adult that these rules were ultimately for her good and were designed to help her flourish in the classroom. I could only imagine what it must be like to be God since salvation is even more important than learning your colors and alphabet, but also because when you truly care about someone and want what is best for them it cuts to the quick when they don’t trust you.

My daily experiences in the classroom changed my reflections on those evenings where I’d meander down the shore of the beach. I eventually stopped focusing on myself as the prodigal on a tough journey home and tried to focus on the Father in the story. It framed everything in a whole new light. I saw a Father who never stops seeking His child. I saw a Father who runs out to meet the son even when it would have made him look ridiculous to his household. I saw a Father who was generosity itself. Most of all I saw a Father whose love was constant and truly unconditional. And the growing trust slowly changed the scene. First I imagined the Father running to meet me. Then I was able to meet the Father outside of the house and offer an awkward apology. Eventually, I made it back to the table and to my surprise  I was not seated as a headstrong woman in my early 20s but as a very little girl marked with the insignia of the family (given from the Father to the son in the parable) because I too had been dead and now I was alive again.

With this interior change, I found a new patience to draw from when it came to dealing with Eve. As time passed we found a way to make it work in group lessons, you could even say we bonded, and she started to exhibit a curious new behavior. Even though she was behaving better during lessons she would shrink into private tantrums more often when she couldn’t do something, particularly when I was present. I asked my more experienced coworker to weigh in and she explained, “She worries that when she fails you’ll be mad at her.”

My coworker’s words struck me because I realized that God had placed me on the other side of the very scenario I had been struggling with, casting me in the role not of the one who needed to trust but of the one who desired to be trusted. While I was fairly surprised that I’d reached a point in the school year where Eve would seek my good opinion, I understood completely. Now that Eve wanted to be a part of my class she was having trouble trusting me to love her as her teacher, thinking I would prefer the best rather than a student like her who struggled.

I instinctively knew I needed to speak to Eve to help build that trust so one day in after school care I tried to give her a sort of secularized version of what God had been saying to me and it came out as follows, “you know I am so proud of you Eve. I have seen how hard you have been working and how hard you try. And I just want you to know that whether you succeed or fail I will always be glad to have you in my classroom.” In that moment I believe Eve realized what I admitted to you all earlier, that she was my favorite student, because she deserved love the least yet needed it the most. And with the smile she gave, I thoroughly understood God’s enduring love for me because for the first time in my life I understood the core of Divine mercy.

To this day I am convinced that the story of the prodigal is not a story of the son, but the story of a Father because only after trusting the merciful Heart of the Father can you become the child.

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Wishing everyone a Blessed Feast of the Epiphany and a Happy Birthday to my Granddad!