Doubting Thomas

So recently I’ve found myself having a sincere affinity for the disciple St. Thomas or “doubting Thomas” as he’s more commonly referred to in Christian circles. He is always brought up as an example of what not to do in the spiritual life and gets sort of rebuked by Jesus who tells him “Have you come to believe because you have seen me? Blessed are they who have not seen and have believed” (John 20:29).

Today possibly for the first time I’m really sympathizing with Thomas. I took a minute to imagine the larger context and what he might have been feeling. Jesus who he loved more than anything, who he had sacrificed everything to follow, had been tortured and killed in an agonizing and humiliating crucifixion.  And I imagine that as Jesus died so many of Thomas’ hopes and dreams died with Him.

Thomas must not only have been afraid, thinking of his own uncertain future, but also heartbroken and feeling like everything he’d ever worked for and wanted had come to naught. Then in the midst of this nothingness, of totally black despair, he hears that Jesus is alive. I imagine he must have had so many emotions. If it was true, what joy. If it was false, he’d have to go through the emotional rollercoaster all over again. Maybe he sensed that Jesus was asking him to have faith, but maybe there was a larger part of him, of his own will and own thoughts, that reminded him of the pain he’d just endured. Maybe he could hear in his interior that broken voice of bitterness and disappointment warning him that he needed to protect himself from further hurt because God hadn’t, look where he’d ended up by following God. I imagine it must have been from this place that he uttered his line recorded in the Bible, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger into the nailmarks and put my hand into his side, I will not believe” (John 20:25).

I imagine I would have done the same thing. I am struggling with the same thing now. With disappointments, with expectations that weren’t met and dreams which I felt God has called me to but which haven’t come true. The little voice in my soul telling me to keep moving forward in faith, hope and love is being drowned out by the emotional barrage of doubt, pain and an unwillingness to endure more which I imagine St. Thomas was also wrestling with.  And from that place I find myself wanting to say the same thing he said.

Thomas would find out a week later with the appearance of Jesus that God keeps His promises. He would see Jesus and touch his pierced hands and side. He would know beyond a shadow of a doubt that Jesus was the Son of God, the long-awaited Messiah who had conquered death for all and ushered in the Kingdom of God.

In the midst of the battle of life do we know this also? Will we choose to cling to the words of Jesus? To hope in what we do not see but which we hope with all our hearts to see? If Jesus were to come back tomorrow would he find us living in that love and in that hope which we are called to live as His disciples?

These are dark times in which we live I won’t deny it. There are struggles that affect the world and struggles that affect our own individual spheres. I personally can’t promise Jesus that I can do this perfectly but I do promise to try and have faith in the dark, to believe without seeing and to live in the hope that one day like Thomas I too will see Jesus and at last come home to that place beyond the light which I have longed to see.

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The Incredibles

Hi all!

May I just say I have missed all of you readers terribly.  I started a new job and while I’m happy to say that I’m loving every minute of it I am busier than ever. Fortunately, my lovely and now Seattle based sister A.C. Wilson has written an amazing guest post that I invite you to read below. Please enjoy as our (mostly her) gift to you on the Feast of the Assumption:

One of my favorite movies ever is a Pixar movie called “The Incredibles.” It’s got everything- action, adventure, family values, coming of age…it’s a great movie (and I hear there’s a sequel coming soon! Yes!). And when reading the gospel, I found myself reminded of one of the last scenes in the movie.

The Incredibles family had just returned from their great adventure, and all is well, until they arrive home. Their youngest son Jack Jack, believed to be with a babysitter, had been kidnapped by the story’s villain, Syndrome. Just as they arrive, Syndrome takes off on his rocket boots with the baby in his arms, and the family is panicking. Suddenly, Mrs. Incredibleturns to her husband and says “Throw something!” and he replies, “I can’t, I might hit Jack Jack!”

But then an awesome revelation occurs, and Mrs. Incredible suggests “Bob, throw me!” and he does. It’s a perfect shot, and the baby, now tumbling from the sky, lands safely in his mother’s arms, and gets to the ground safely. Then Mr.Incredible, after hearing another threat to his son’s life, hurls his *new* car at Syndrome’s plane, and effectively destroys him.

And this whole turn of events reminded me of the parable of the wheat and the weeds, where Jack Jack is the wheat, an innocent baby who is nothing but loved by his Father, and Syndrome is the weed, which represents a person with evil planted deep in his heart by Satan. If Mr. Incredible had hurled his car at the retreating Syndrome too soon, it would have destroyed evil, but also his child. So immediately it was out of the question.

So it is with God and the problem of evil. He could toss his divine “car” and destroy Satan whenever he likes, but if it isn’t a well timed throw, he would, with his crushing blow, destroy our freedom to choose Him, making us little more than spiritual ants, with no say for our own souls. So immediately it is out of the question. Because God made us to be more than ants. And He can and will destroy evil, but not until the proper time.

But people don’t get this, myself included at times. We see sin in it’s ugliest, most base form, and naturally we are repulsed. As we should be. We have all grown up among the wheat and the weeds. But then we ask God “Why?” Why would a loving God make the world this way, with so much suffering and evil?  And that is a question we cannot ask.

Because the real question we should be asking is “Why not?” In a world tainted by original sin, why do we not expect sin and evil to manifest itself? And this is not meant to be callous or unfeeling toward the suffering in the world. It is truly shameful that we allow certain sufferings to persist, heartbreaking when we can’t predict or mitigate it, and all around contrary to how God originally designed us to live. But the question remains, why should we expect the world to work in harmony and goodness, while the worldly, respected powers that be tried and convicted the true source of harmony and goodness (see: Christ’s Passion and death) for the crimes of mankind?

And that is the most extreme case, but I think it has real bearing in our lives today. How often do we blame our problems on God? How often do we neglect our prayers, and then blame God for being the cold and unfeeling one? How often to we distract ourselves every which way, and blame God when our lives have no direction? I know I do. Often.

But that acknowledgment is exactly why God holds back his judgment. Because we are sinful and sorrowful, weak and in need of a savior. He knows that, and He is our loving Father. When we truly believe that we are weak but God loves us, and rely on him, then the world becomes a less dark, sinful place. Plus, when we choose Him over all the temptations and delights of the world, a love that you know is true and unselfish is able to form.

Going back to our metaphor, when Mr. Incredible couldn’t throw the car, he sent his wife. So God sent His son, to save us from the seemingly insurmountable plot against us. It’s our job to resist evil, to allow Jesus to rescue us, and live the mission in gratitude. God will take care of the rest.

 

Spiritual Hangovers

Believe it or not this fantastic expression was not invented by me but rather the wonderful Mother Angelica. I’ve included a link here where she explains it in detail but in summary, it’s the idea that just as one can overindulge in alcohol and experience a response of pain from the body one can also overindulge in un-Christian feelings from the past or projections of the future and live in a “spiritual hangover” of bitterness, resentment, hatred or fear rather than in the graces God provides in the present moment.

Mother Angelica in her writings always strikes a wonderful balance between an understanding hug and swift kick in the pants and I find on my spiritual walk that I am in need of both those things. I love her metaphor because I find it both funny and convicting. How often do we justify ourselves in our feeling rather than trying to overcome them? Certainly more times than I’d care to admit on my blog…

But rather than share any personal reflection (because I’m sure you’re sick of those!) I wrote this blog post more to share a resource that I think is just great and which I hope gives you something to think about as well as a sincere chuckle.

Hope everyone is having an excellent summer so far! I can’t believe how fast it’s going.